Satin and silk boxers are widely appreciated for their sensual appeal, comfort and healthfulness. The qualities of satin and silk boxers sometimes overlap, as some satin boxers are woven from silk. However, the majority of satin boxers primarily contains a weave of polyester, acetate, nylon and rayon, and thus is less expensive. When choosing between satin and silk boxers, consider your preferences for the fabric's appearance and texture.

Costs

While both silk and satin underwear are shiny and soft, each has related expenses at various points. Silk underwear, initially, is slightly more expensive than satin underwear. However, silk underwear requires a less-complicated dry-cleaning process than satin does. Satin underwear made of a mixture of materials, on the other hand, is more prone to staining and requires a more complicated dry-cleaning process when it does stain; in addition, it is more likely to be ruined during cleaning.

Wearing Silk

Silk underwear -- prepared from silk spun by silk moths -- is widely considered more luxurious than any other kind of underwear. Many people may think silk is softer and more comfortable than satin; in addition, it is lighter in weight, making it an ideal choice for hot summer nights. Further, silk is highly breathable. It absorbs moisture and allows moisture to evaporate, reducing the chances of infections or uncomfortable rashes. Finally, silk's sleekness makes it less likely to bunch up underneath your pants, creating unsightly bulges.

The Practicality of Satin

Satin underwear, unlike silk, is well suited for the winter if it contains synthetic fibers. Like silk, satin absorbs moisture, but allows less evaporation, so it can help maintain body heat. In addition, satin underwear is stronger than silk and is likely to last longer, especially as it ages. Satin underwear is far more practical as a form of underwear to wear daily, and it offers silk underwear's visual appeal.

Downsides of Silk and Satin

Both silk and satin are relatively high-maintenance clothing materials, prone to staining and requiring dry-cleaning. Both are more susceptible to damage -- like ripping -- than cotton underwear is. Silk underwear is less suited for cold weather, and silk thermal underwear -- designed to deal with this problem -- lacks much of the visual appeal that makes silk an attractive choice for boxers. In addition, both silk and satin underwear are substantially more expensive than their cotton counterpart is.