The American Bankers Association issues banks and other financial institutions ABA routing numbers. The numbers, in use since 1910, identify the agency responsible for a certain financial transaction. A bank might have several routing numbers that represent the different types of transactions it processes. One number indicates a wire transfer while another points to a check withdrawal, for example. Checks display the institution's routing number next to the bank account number. Some online resources also help you find it.

Step 1

Go to the website Bank Routing Numbers. (See References.) Type the name of the bank in the first box on the page. Click "Search." The system displays the institution's ABA routing number in a table that also includes the bank's address and phone number.

Step 2

Visit your bank's website. Some institutions post their routing number online, but you might have to look for it. Check under "Customer Service," "FAQs" and "About Us," for example. If the bank's homepage has a search box, type "routing number."

Step 3

Log in to your bank account. Follow the system's prompts to retrieve one of your bank statements. Read the document's header. Some institutions print the routing number alongside the client's account number.

Step 4

Email the bank's customer service from the link on the institution's website. Ask what the bank's ABA routing number is. Check your email messages for the answer.