Choosing an easy thesis topic is just good common sense. The easier your thesis topic, the easier to successfully create a quality paper for your course. If you find it hard to know what makes a thesis topic "easy" or "difficult," here are some factors to consider in making your decision.

Step 1

Think of topics that are interesting to you. If you enjoy what you're writing about, you will be more engaged in your subject. Think of the course you're writing for and try to remember subjects that you found engaging. Base a thesis on similar material. If the class you're writing for is one that you're not terribly interested in, think of something outside what you've studied that you can relate to the requirements of the assignment.

Step 2

Consider ease of research and availability of resources. Get to know your college library, if you haven't already done so, and learn what tools are available there. Do a preliminary check with all printed and electronic resources to gauge the availability of information about your topic. Next, look at a few of these resources to see how hard it is to find information that you can use to support your thesis. Consider keeping your topic, but changing your thesis, if you find that it's harder to prove than you thought.

Step 3

Assess the likely scope of papers written on your perspective thesis. Look at the assignment guidelines, particularly length requirements, and determine how likely it is that a well-rounded and researched argument of your thesis is going to fit into those parameters. Choose another thesis if you find it would be difficult to make your paper short enough or long enough without shortchanging the presentation. Do some preliminary outlining to help with this process.

Step 4

Discuss the topics you're considering with your professor or teacher's assistant. This person will be able to give you insight on whether or not your topic is one that will be easy to be successful with in this particular class.