How Do You Place a Question Mark When You Ask More Than One Question?

by S.R. Haines

A question mark is placed at the end of a sentence that is a direct question. In most instances, **two questions become two sentences, with a question mark at the end of each sentence**.

Two Questions, One Mark

Two questions can be **rephrased** to create one sentence with one question mark. You can ask two questions: Do you want meat? Do you want fish? An alternative is: Do you want meat or fish? Another example of using one mark for two questions, from the University of Maryland Writing Center, uses a **quotation**: Did Fadumo ask, “Are we going to the Washington Monument?”

One Sentence, Many Questions

The Capital Community College Foundation offers this example of how to **combine one question with several follow-up questions** into one sentence: "Who is responsible for executing the plan? the coach? the coaching staff? the players?" Some writers, however, instead follow the rule that each follow-up question should begin with a capital letter.

About the Author

S.R. Haines is a veteran writer whose work has been published by newspapers, magazines, international news wire services and nonprofit publications on topics ranging from breaking news and politics to travel, parenting, education, business and technology. She earned a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin.

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