In a textual analysis, the analyzer must go further than describing details. He doesn't state whether he agrees with the opinion in the text but rather analyzes the effectiveness of how the author has presented her argument. He should analyze and describe the success of the individual methods used, discussing whether these techniques achieve the intended purpose and if they are suitable for the intended audience. The analyzer must state how he arrived at these conclusions.

Read the work that you will be analyzing. Make sure you understand the general idea being portrayed.

Reread the text carefully and meticulously and ensure you understand it completely. Write down anything that is difficult to comprehend, and mark, on the article, any points relevant to your analysis.

Divide the text into separate components, such as sentences, paragraphs, phrases and words. Consider each element of the piece, searching for patterns to gain a better understanding of the text. Jot down notes about your ideas.

Look for the meaning of the text as a whole by piecing together the smaller elements. Think about how the writer communicates her idea and why this concept is important.

Plan the layout of your work by deciding on the most logical order for the points you intend to discuss. Don't necessarily follow the chronological sequence of the text you are analyzing.

Start your analysis by including the title, author and main purpose of the text in the first sentence. Continue your paper with your interpretation of the article. You may wish to start drafting the main body before returning to write the introduction.

Find examples in the text to back your work. Refer to these details and quote them in your analysis.

Conclude the article without repeating information. Ensure your paper has a strong summary that allows it to sound finished.

Reread your paper to check for spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.