One (or more) of your Twitter followers sends you a direct message letting you know that you have been sending out spam, but you haven't tweeted in days. You take a look at your profile and find that your account has sent tweets and direct messages without your knowledge. Learning what to do if your account has been hacked or otherwise compromised can help you stop the spam and protect your upstanding Twitter reputation.

Step 1

Change your password. Log in to your Twitter account, click the gear icon and select "Settings." Click "Password" in the left pane. Enter your current password and then type in a new password in both the New Password and Verify Password boxes. Choose a password that is at least 10 characters long with a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters as well as symbols and numbers for greater security.

Step 2

Revoke untrusted third-party access. Log in to your Twitter account, click the gear icon and select "Settings." Click "Apps" in the left pane. Click the "Revoke Access" button next to any applications you do not recognize or may not trust.

Step 3

Update trusted third-parties. Provide your updated Twitter password to any third-party applications that you trust to use your Twitter password.

Step 4

Delete any tweets that appear to be spam. Log in to your Twitter account and click "Me" on the menu bar. Click "Delete" on each tweet that you did not create.

Step 5

Scan, clean and protect your computer. Check for any available Windows updates. Update or install antivirus and anti-spyware software and scan your computer for malicious content.