Holding your partner close, looking into her eyes and being in tune with each other's moves are critical components of any successful dance couple. Ironically these are also traits that a person may show you when she has a crush on you -- sometimes leading to missed cues and crossed signals. Some signs of attraction are obvious, such as flirting and making plans with you outside of your dancing obligations, but because many dance styles are intimate, it can be difficult to decipher if normal signs of attraction such as eye contact, touching and smiling are because your partner has a crush on you or if it's just part of the act.

Eye Appeal

The amount of eye contact your dance partner makes with you can be an indication of how she feels about you. The old saying that "eyes are the window to the soul" may have some scientific validity, according to a study conducted by Joan Kellerman and her research associates in the June 1989 edition of the "Journal of Research and Personality." In her study, Kellerman concluded that the amount of direct eye contact made between test subjects had a direct response to feelings of attraction and romantic love. Look for other non-verbal signs of attraction such as smiling, laughing or playing with her hair while making eye contact.

Getting Close

By its nature, dance is an intimate sport that many times places both partners in close proximity to others. Even contemporary dance styles that don't focus as much on proximity can feature moves that can generate chemistry between partners, which may send mixed signals. Although it can be easy to misinterpret your dance moves for chemistry, the real test happens off the dance floor. If your dance partner sits close to you, leans in toward you and otherwise breaks your bubble of personal space in other situations, then this can be a sign that she's crushing on you.

She Opens Up to You

If your dance partner tells you secrets about her life, has developed cute inside jokes or confides in you when she's feeling upset, she might see you as more than just a dance partner. Richard Archer and Christie Cook examined this phenomenon in a study published in the September 1986 volume of "Social Psychology Quarterly." In this, Archer and Cook found that participants reported feeling higher levels of attraction to other participants who disclosed personal issues to them as opposed to those who kept their interactions on the surface.

She Makes an Effort to Connect

Whether she offers to bring you a home-baked snack to enjoy after your class, calls you on the phone or makes it a point to try to hang out with you when you're not dancing, your partner's attempt to connect with you outside of dance may be a sign that she has more than platonic feelings for you. While it's normal for friends to invite other friends over to hang out, go shopping or go for a dip in the pool, if your partner starts to take an interest in your hobbies or suggests doing things alone, such as going to dinner or a movie, it might be a sign that she's trying to get closer and expand your relationship beyond the dance floor.