After you teach the beginners in your class how to use computers, they can use their new knowledge to check their bank account online, create documents and better manage their bills online or with a computer software program. However, you must teach at a slow pace, avoid information overload, and inspire students who might become frustrated because they have no prior background in technology.

Evaluate the skills of each student you have in your class. Ask those who sign up for your computer class to write down the skills they want to learn and computer abilities they possess. Communicate with other computer teachers in your area to find out what they commonly teach at this level. For example, novice learners may want to learn basic computer skills such as spreadsheet creation, social media account set-up or how to navigate websites.

Prepare your classes in advance. Knowing what you plan to teach before you hold your class builds confidence, the students get a well-prepared lesson and the entire class flows more smoothly. Design a lesson plan on your own or go to sites such as Teachnology (see Resources) to develop a class to inspire your students.

Instruct your students to open Microsoft Word or a similar program to write a letter to someone they care about. This shows the students that they can use the computer to perform tasks that are not overly technical. Make sure they check for grammar or spelling errors with the "spell check" feature.

Create a presentation in student groups. Your students might learn more if they take an active role in your class, so make it a point to get them involved with each task. For example, teach them to create a presentation about their business, family members, or other topic with which they feel comfortable. Once they work with a group of classmates to develop a presentation with their computers, each group gets a turn to show the entire class what they developed.