The Canadian Achievement Test (CAT) is a standardized test created by the Canadian Test Center. Two different types of CAT are available, CAT 3 and CAT 4. CAT 4, is the newest and was released in 2008. Both of the Canadian Achievement Test's are based on Canadian society and values. The CAT tests are administered to school children across Canada to compare curricula from different districts as well as the effectiveness of each curriculum. Scores are also accessible to parents to compare their child's score with that of national averages. Preparing for a CAT should ideally involve collaboration between student, parents and teachers. Commercial prep courses and study guides are available as well.

Practice reading comprehension.

In the weeks prior to the test date, read short stories and articles. Anything from magazine articles to newspaper articles are useful. Practice summarizing the story, describing the main characters and relating the plot. You can also watch television shows and movies to practice memory and comprehension.

Strengthen vocabulary.

Identify, spell and attempt to use in a sentence words from your surroundings in the weeks prior to the test date. Visit museums, parks, cities and other locations that are not familiar. Make a list of things you wish to understand better or define. Learn as many new words as possible and successfully spell and use them in sentences. Nonstopenglish.com also offers a list of activities to strengthen English vocabulary.

Perfect spelling and grammar skills.

Proper spelling and grammar includes punctuation, correct usage of homonyms, and parts of speech. This needs to work in conjunction with the other steps. For example, when summarizing the plot of a story, use full sentences with correct spelling and grammar.

Practice essay writing.

Essay writing is about organizational structure and ideas. Common steps in essay writing include brainstorming, word webs and rough outlines. Ensure familiarity with proper essay structure and practice organizing ideas. Activities such as timed brainstorming can duplicate the pressure of standardized test essay writing. The Brainstorm Center for Learning and Development offers courses and tutorials to strengthen brainstorming and effective writing skills.

Repeat simple math equations.

Review addition, subtraction, multiplication and division rules. Practice solving simple equations. Although these may seem simple, repetition will ensure success under pressure. Furthermore, perfection of simple equations helps in solving more difficult math problems including patterns, sequencing, algebra and order of operations. Practice online at websites such as That Quiz.com including sample questions on integers, fractions, concepts and geometry.