Learning basic writing skills online takes a bit of dedication. The task will require a good amount of reading, as well as practice, practice and more practice. Reading is important, but it's not enough, and it will not give you the insight of actual writing experience. If you are motivated and self-directed, there are several different ways you can go about learning basic writing skills online.

Step 1

Take advantage of higher learning opportunities. The Internet is full of writing websites from community colleges and universities. The Purdue University Online Writing Lab is an excellent site that is accessed by students all over the country, from junior high through college. Capital Community College of Hartford, Connecticut, similarly has an extensive site that will guide you from words and sentences to essays and research papers, as well as the principles of composition. You can also explore the websites of other community colleges and universities for more guidance on basic writing skills.

Step 2

Use the resources and complete the writing exercises offered on the educational websites. For example, Capital Community College offers quizzes within the lessons. The OWL at Purdue offers resources for junior through high school students, English as a second language students, professional writers, and adults working on General Educational Development (GED), resumes, and other projects. In some cases, you can even ask questions via email or have short questions answered over the phone.

Step 3

Visit other well-known grammar websites. Grammar Girl offers "Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing." The Paradigm Online Writing Assistant can help you with basic punctuation, sentence concepts and problem areas. Some well-known basic writing books are now available online. For example, Bartleby.com has "The Elements of Style" by William Strunk, Jr.

Step 4

Sign up for an online writing course. Many community colleges and universities offer online writing courses. EduFire.com has courses available for 10 to 30 dollars per session. Alternatively, some universities, such as Purdue or Massachusetts Institute of Technology, have made their coursework for writing classes freely available to the online public.