Intelligence assessment tools can be used alone or in conjunction with other assessments tools to accurately test for intelligence. With that said, these are only tools that can be used to gain some insight into the psyche and different types of intelligence that an individual might have. Assessment tools can be used prior to teaching and post teaching to measure learning, and they can also be used to test for general intelligence.

The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test

The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test measures verbal and non-verbal skills. The verbal scale measures knowledge of words, as well as their meaning, but does not require reading or spelling. It tests for crystal knowledge, or rote memorization skills, in receptive and expressive vocabulary. This scale helps to determine whether a person is able to understand the relationships between given items and also measures whether the person is able to easily form analogies. One positive aspect of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test is that it has remained free of gender or cultural bias. Bias in intelligence testing has questioned the reliability of older intelligence tests.

Emotional Intelligence Tests

Emotional intelligence is thought by some to be the most important intelligence of them all. The theory behind this assertion is that no matter how intelligent you are in all other areas, 50% of your intelligence is emotional/social intelligence. If you receive 100% on the Wechsler but only 50% on the emotional intelligence test, it is considered a failing grade.We must communicate with others effectively, form cohesive groups, successfully lead or follow a team, or have the necessary skills to successfully communicate with others. Unlike the skills in basic intelligence, emotional intelligence is extremely hard to teach. It tends to be an inborn trait.

Wechsler Intelligence Test

The Wechsler Intelligence test was the first IQ test designed by David Wechsler in 1896. He paved the path for all the other psychological tests that became mainstream methods of IQ testing. Fifteen years after creating the Wechsler IQ test, he revised and renamed it the WAIS. The verbal WAIS scales, test for areas of intelligence such as persistence, vocabulary, math and digit span. The WAIS is still commonly used in schools today.

Stanford-Binet-V Intelligence Scales

French psychologist Alfred Binet was the first person to suggest intelligence testing in 1904 with some barbaric terminology that can be considered offensive. He used terms such as idiot, imbecile, moron and dull before the scores started to climb for an individual. His test covered areas such as verbal scales and performance scales with a number of categories in each one. For instance, in the verbal category, individuals were tested for comprehension, vocabulary and arithmetic. The performance scales included areas such as object assembly, picture completion and matrix reasoning.

The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test

The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test measures verbal and non-verbal skills. The verbal scale measures knowledge of words, as well as their meaning, but does not require reading or spelling. It tests for crystal knowledge, or rote memorization skills, in receptive and expressive vocabulary. This scale helps to determine whether a person is able to understand the relationships between given items and also measures whether the person is able to create analogies. One positive aspect of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test is that it has remained free of gender or cultural bias. Bias in intelligence testing has questioned the reliability of older intelligence tests.