How to Deliver a Black History Month Speech. Though written, audio and visual resources are essential in delivering information about black history, nothing moves an audience more than an effective speech. When you feel passionate about your subject, you carry your listeners along with you. This can spur more people to action more than any written plea. Black History Month is a great time to talk about racial prejudice, inequality and tolerance.

Open your speech with a reference to slavery. Emphasize it's not just about black history. Slavery undermined the entire foundation of America. Explain how it related to the Civil War from both the northern and southern points of view.

Move on to the Civil Rights Movement. People tend to think it began and ended with Martin Luther King, so emphasize the activities of others such as Rosa Parks and Malcolm X.

Spend a good part of your speech on the accomplishments of Martin Luther King. Quote liberally from his speeches as his words are still relevant and move us today. Note how his achievements changed the face of America forever.

Talk about African American culture and how it influenced America. The accomplishments of jazz musicians and Harlem Renaissance artists, for instance, are just as important to Black History Month as the Civil Rights Movement.

End your speech by emphasizing why it's important to remember African American struggles and triumphs. Discuss what's changed and what hasn't. Tell your audience what they can do to promote justice and equality.

Use visuals in your speech. Show slides to emphasize important points, making your audience understand the connections between black history and the current state of African Americans.

Provide handouts with your speech highlighting important accomplishments in black history. Include a section on the work America still needs to do to live up to its reputation. Encourage your audience to support causes throughout the month that work for racial justice.