Learn to count to 10 in Korean.
Learn to count to 10 in Korean.

Learning to count from one to 10 in Korean can be challenging for a native English speaker. Some of the sounds are difficult to recreate for the English speaking tongue. To make matters even more difficult, there are two ways to count from one to 10 in Korean. Native Korean is used to count things, while Sino Korean is used to count time. Americans commonly count to 10 in native Korean while practicing Korean martial arts like Tae Kwon Do or Hapkido.

Count the number one by saying "hana," pronounced "HA-nah" in Native Korean or "il," pronounced "ill," in Sino Korean.

Count the number two by saying "dul," pronounced "dool" in Native Korean or "i," pronounced "ee," in Sino Korean.

Count the number three by saying "set," pronounced "set" in Native Korean or "sam," pronounced "sam," in Sino Korean.

Count the number four by saying "net," pronounced "net" in Native Korean or "sa," pronounced "sah," in Sino Korean.

Count the number five by saying "da-sul," pronounced "DA-sut" in Native Korean or "o," pronounced "oh," in Sino Korean.

Count the number six by saying "yuh-seot," pronounced "YA-sut" in Native Korean or "yuk," pronounced "yook," in Sino Korean.

Count the number seven by saying "il-gop," pronounced "EEL-gope" in Native Korean or "ch'il," pronounced "CH-eel," in Sino Korean.

Count the number eight by saying "yuh-deol," pronounced "YA-dool" in Native Korean or "p'al," pronounced "P-all," in Sino Korean.

Count the number nine by saying "ah-hop," pronounced "AH-hope" in Native Korean or "ku," pronounced "goo," in Sino Korean.

Count the number 10 by saying "yeol," pronounced "yool" in Native Korean or "sip," pronounced "ship," in Sino Korean.