There are a wide range of job options available for those that wish to pursue a career in the medical field. The phlebotomy profession is a great choice and a career that is in high demand. But before you decide if this path is right for you, you may want to consider the educational requirements that you need to be successful.

What is Phlebotomy?

A phlebotomist is a laboratory technician who is responsible for taking blood samples from patients for medical testing or, on occasion, donations. These technicians commonly work in hospitals or specialized blood centers and work alongside other lab technicians. The average pay rate for this job varies from $25,000 to about $40,000 annually, depending on geographic location and the company for which you work.

How to Become a Phlebotomist

Many trade and technical schools offer programs in phlebotomy. A high school degree is required along with completion of a phlebotomy training program through an accredited institution. Students are required to study subjects like Patient Interaction Principles, Legal Aspects of Blood Collection, Blood Collection Techniques and CPR. You must also be trained in Phlebotomy Medical Terminology as well as Clinical Practices. Upon completion of a training program, the common certification is an Associate degree that is generally finished in two years or less.

Where to Go

Check your local area for schools that offer training in phlebotomy and find the institution that fits you best. There are also online certifications available through programs like University of Phoenix if you don't have the time to travel to class every day. Nationally accredited trade schools like Kaplan University also offer great programs. Some states have schools that are dedicated solely to training phlebotomists and don't require general education classes like many universities and colleges. No matter where you go to get your training, the field of phlebotomy is valuable and perfect for people who want to make a difference in the lives of others.