Kindergarten teachers are tasked with giving students a great start in education and helping them build a strong foundation for learning. If you're thinking about becoming a kindergarten teacher, you'll need to ensure that you're prepared to take on the myriad duties such a task entails. There's no single recipe that works for every child, and kindergarten teachers need to be prepared to manage behavior and implement different strategies to help children begin their educational careers on the right foot.

Education

Kindergarten is the first introduction many children get to formal education, and a primary duty of kindergarten teachers is to ensure that children are ready to start first grade. Basic tasks include teaching reading skills, such as letters and vowel sounds, teaching numbers and counting, helping children learn colors and shapes, and instilling a love of reading by frequently sharing written stories.

Socialization

Kindergartners can be unruly and unpredictable, and kindergarten teachers must be prepared to manage a classroom full of unique personalities. Consistency, attentiveness and explaining rules clearly all play roles in behavior management. Teachers should also help students master basic social skills, such as sharing, communicating, resolving conflicts and apologizing. Some students might need additional help developing social skills or learning to control their own behavior, and teachers should be prepared to work with students and their parents to develop behavioral plans.

Administration

Running a school can be challenging work, and kindergarten teachers may have to participate in basic administrative tasks, such as writing incident reports or requesting special services for students. Some schools also require that teachers keep records on each students' weaknesses, strengths and educational progress. You might also be required to have conferences with parents or deliver regular educational and behavioral reports to parents.

Early Intervention

Early intervention plays a key role in helping students get the services they need. Kindergarten teachers should know the early signs of autism, attention deficit disorder, mental health problems, dyslexia and similar conditions. You might need to refer students to specialists or help their parents recognize and manage their conditions. Teachers are also mandatory reporters, which means they're legally obligated to report child abuse. If you notice a child is coming to school hungry or injured, you're obligated to report this to child protective services or your supervisor.