Many adults and children who are new to the United States attend classes to learn the English language. Early ESL, or English as a Second Language, classes often focus on the parts of speech. More simple parts of speech, such as nouns and verbs, are often followed by teaching students the more complex elements, such as prepositions and adverbs. There are five different types of adverbs that must be learned.

Manner Adverbs

Adverbs of manner are ones that answer the question "how?" These adverbs show how something, such as an action, is done. In a sentence, manner adverbs typically follow the verb, which is a part of speech that represents a state or action, such as "sing." An example of an adverb of manner used in a sentence is the word "beautifully" in the sentence "he sings beautifully."

Time Adverbs

Adverbs of time demonstrate when something, such as an action, happens or is done; these types of adverbs answer the question "when?" An adverb of time is situated by the English speaker or writer at the beginning or the end of a sentence. An example of an adverb of time used in a sentence is the word "yesterday" in the sentence "I saw you yesterday."

Place Adverbs

Adverbs of place show a listener or reader where something, such as an action like "walk," happens or is done. These adverbs answer the question "where?" In a sentence, adverbs of place are used following the verb. A simple example of a place adverb used in a sentence is the word "here" used in the sentence "I live here." A more complicated example is the phrase "in the restaurant" used in the sentence "we met her in the restaurant."

Degree Adverbs

Adverbs of degree, or quantity, are parts of speech that answer the question "how much?" or "to what extent?" These are placed before the adverb, which is a part of speech that describes a verb, adverb or adjective, and the adjective, which is a part of speech that describes a noun, in a sentence. An example of an adverb of degree is the word "nearly" in the sentence "the glass is nearly full."

Frequency Adverbs

Adverbs of frequency are often-used parts of speech that answer the question "how often?" Examples of adverbs of frequency include such words as "never," "seldom," "usually," "almost," "hardly ever," "sometimes," "already," "quite," "occasionally" and "rarely." These adverbs follow the verb "to be" and are placed before the simple tenses of all other verbs. A frequency adverb is the word "often" in the sentence "he is often happy."