Your heart starts beating faster, your palms begin to sweat, and your cheeks are flushed. No, you aren't on a whirling, twirling amusement park ride. Although it may feel like you're riding a roller coaster, you have your feet planted firmly on the ground. Instead, you're feeling the overwhelming emotions of a crush.

Constant Craving Feeling

An intense attraction to or infatuation with your crush may make you constantly crave his presence. Even if you don't really know him that well, you may find yourself thinking of ways to be near him. For example, you might change your route from class to class so that you bump into him in the hallway every day or switch morning coffee shop spots to the one that he goes to. The need to be near your crush may almost feel like you're addicted to seeing him, according to licensed therapist Debra Manchester MacMannis in the article "Why Do Fools Fall in Love? Our Brains Have Some Answers" on the "Psych Central" website.

Nervous Nellie

A crush isn't all giddy butterflies and gleeful smiles. When you have a crush, the initial attraction toward the other person may make you feel anxious. When you're near your love interest, it's normal to get a case of nerves. You might not know what to say around her or how to act. This may make you come across as tongue-tied, shy or even awkward when it comes to actually approaching her.

Physical Side

Crushes happen when you have an attraction toward someone but haven't yet developed true closeness to that person, according to the article "Love and Romance" on the "Teens Health" website. You may find yourself noticing your crush's looks or focusing on his appearance more than you do anyone else's. For example, you may gab nonstop to your friends about how hot your crush is or how he has the greenest eyes you've ever seen. Additionally, you may think about what holding hands with, hugging or kissing your crush feels like.

American Idol

Sometimes focusing on your crush's appearance may go from infatuation to idolization. Teens and young adults tend to project attributes onto a crush that they feel are ideal, according to psychologist Carl Pickhardt in the article "Adolescence and the Teenage Crush" on the "Psychology Today" website. You may elevate the status of your crush, making yourself feel insignificant in comparison or like you're not good enough to date her. This may make you shy away from talking to her. That said, you need to remember that your crush is a real person just like you are.