Children are considered toddlers around the time they start to "toddle" around. This stage lasts until the child is about 3 years old. During this stage in a child's life, attention span is very short and long periods of sitting still just isn't going to work. They need lots of controlled activities during the day. If you are a teacher working on lesson plans, this article shows how to create lesson plans for toddlers. By following these steps, you may be tired by the end of the day, but the toddlers will have learned more than you could have ever imagined.

Every lesson plan needs an overall goal. For toddlers, this goal needs to be general, such as "introducing cooperation skills into the classroom."

The goal statement needs to be followed by specific objectives. "The toddlers will take turns watering the plant at the science center" is an example of an objective. This objective would work well with the goal stated in step 1. The toddlers will learn that by using cooperation, special things can be made or done.

Set up centers in the classroom and implement their use in the lesson plan, such as science, math, reading, role play, and arts and crafts centers, adding new activities to some of the centers every so often. Include their use in your lesson plans. For example, if you are learning about cooperation, add an art gallery to the art and crafts center. Each toddler can add his or her own picture to create a big art gallery. This activity will help enforce what can be accomplished when cooperation is used.

Include circle time in your lesson plan. Include new books about cooperation (or whatever you are learning about) and games you can play together.

Include recipes in your lesson plan, if you think it is appropriate to the goal of the lesson. Three ingredient recipes are probably sufficient, because nothing should be too complicated for toddlers. Making a simple s'more sandwich is enough to add interest and teach a lesson.