Rejection is never painless, but it can be agonizingly harrowing in a long-term relationship. Whether the breakup came out of the blue, or your instincts told you something wasn’t quite right long ago, the pain can leave your heart gasping for air. Not only did you share the contents of your heart and soul with this person, but you might have also shared friends, classes at school and extracurricular activities. You can cope with the rejection by learning what to expect and how to use strategies that encourage your heart to heal.

Don't Go With the Flow of Negative Feelings

When your heart feels fractured in a million different places, it’s tempting to blame yourself for the unhappy outcome of your relationship. Don’t fall into this pattern of negative thinking that can push you into a downward spiral of sadness. Instead, give yourself daily reminders about your talents and qualities that make you undeniably unique, recommends TeensHealth online in the article, “Getting Over a Break-up.” Your loyal friends and family members can remind you if you experience problems remembering your positive traits.

Reclaim You

The hobbies, interests and activities that you enjoyed prior to your relationship remain an integral part of who you are, even though you may not feel motivated to participate in these activities following a breakup. There’s no need to jump back in, but gradually return to a diversion you like, suggests Helpguide.org in the article, “Coping With a Breakup or Divorce: Moving on After a Relationship Ends.” It’s OK to permit yourself some down time, but don’t wait too long to enjoy some new music from a favorite artist, a movie or pizza with a friend.

Be Mad, Sad and Glad

Sometimes your responses to rejection by your boyfriend can be baffling, but allow yourself to feel these emotions that may not make sense. For example, perhaps you may feel bluer than blue one moment, but experience an unexpected surge of angry feelings that blindsides you a few moments later. Expect to experience a wide range of intense emotions that ebb and flow. Your feelings don’t have to make sense right now, and they will subside over time.

Put on a Happy Face

Laughter and humor are soothing therapies that help to relieve the effects of the stress related to rejection. You need incentives to laugh, so seek out opportunities to share humor with others. Spend time with friends and family members who like to laugh says the article "Laughter is the Best Medicine," in Helpguide.org. Join them in watching a funny movie or belting out a karaoke classic. Humor permits you to redefine some of your negative feelings, diminish anxiety and dissipate the storm clouds gathering in your heart.