American colonial uniforms were not as brightly colored as the red coats the British soldiers wore in the Revolutionary War. They also weren't as perfectly matched. Due to shortages, Continental soldiers were sometimes forced to dye the uniforms of their captured enemy to suit their needs.

The Continental Army Blue Coats

The Continental Army wore white breeches and white vests under blue coats. Trim varied according to regiment. Drummers and fifers typically wore the reverse color combination of the rest of their regiment. New Englanders wore blue coats trimmed and lined in white, while their drummers and fifers wore white coats trimmed in blue. The coats of New York and New Jersey soldiers had buff trim and were lined in white. The middle colony regiments of Pennsylvania and Delaware, and Maryland and Virginia regiments, wore coats trimmed in red with white lining. The Carolinas and Georgia dressed in blue coats trimmed in blue with button holes edged in white. All Continental soldiers generally wore cocked, tricorn hats.

Special Regimental Uniforms

The Green Mountain Boys were a special regiment that began in Vermont. They wore green coats trimmed in red with buckskin vests underneath. They also wore buckskin breeches with wool stockings, checked shirts and black felt hats.

The Minutemen and Militia

Colonial militia or minutemen did not have uniforms. They wore their own clothes. The only requirements of a militiaman were that he have his own weapons -- in this case, a musket -- ammunition, food, water and blankets. He typically carried a canteen and a knapsack on his back to hold enough supplies for at least a day.