How to Cite a College Brochure

by Maggie Lourdes, Demand Media

Commonly followed writing styles, such as MLA, APA and Chicago, generally use similar rules for citing brochures as they do for books. It is important to properly cite all outside materials used to support written projects to eliminate charges of plagiarism. It is also important to confirm and follow the writing style preferred by individual professors.

APA Style

The American Psychological Association style, or APA style, is the writing style generally followed in the social sciences. The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed., 2nd printing) cites a college brochure by starting with the college's name, followed by a period. The year of publication is then stated parenthetically, followed by a period. The name of the brochure is stated in italics, followed by a period. Next, the word "pamphlet," without the quotation marks, is put within square brackets and followed by a period. Lastly, the city of publication, followed by a colon, and the publisher, followed by a period, completes the citation.

MLA Style

The Modern Language Association, or MLA, style is typically used in the liberal arts and humanities. The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th ed.) cites a college brochure by beginning with the college's name followed by a period. Next, the title of the brochure is identified, in italics, followed by another period. The city of publication is then listed and is followed by a colon. The publisher is added, followed by a comma and the year of publication and then a period. Lastly, the medium of publication is mentioned and followed by a period to round out the citation.

Chicago Style

The Chicago citation style is frequently followed in the history and humanities disciplines. The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.) also provides citation rules for references to college brochures. The citation begins with the college's name followed by a period. Next, the brochure's title is stated, in italics, followed by a period. The city of publication is named, followed by a colon. The publisher, a comma and then the year of publication are next, ending with a period to round out the citation.

About the Author

Maggie Lourdes is a full-time attorney in southeast Michigan. She teaches law at Cleary University in Ann Arbor and online for National University in San Diego. Her writing has been featured in "Realtor Magazine," the N.Y. State Bar's "Health Law Journal," "Oakland County Legal News," "Michigan Probate & Estate Planning Journal," "Eye Spy Magazine" and "Surplus Today" magazine.

Photo Credits

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