How Do Bombs Do Damage?

By Walter Unglaub

There are three primary ways in which a bomb that detonates does damage.Find out about how bombs do damage with help from an experienced physics professional in this free video clip.

Transcript

Hello, my name is Walter Unglaub, and this is how do bombs do damage. Well, there are three primary ways in which a bomb that detonates does damage. The first is shock. So shock is a description for the type of damage that occurs from the shock waves when a bomb detonates. The shock waves are a result of a lot of energy being released in a small volume in a short amount of time which induces a great amount of pressure on the surrounding air, or whatever material surrounds the bomb. If it was under water, then this pressure would push the water molecules away. So this great amount of pressure can do a lot of damage because this pressure can push against certain objects, and if it's a lot of pressure applied in a small amount of time, then it can cause a destruction or break those objects. A second type of damage that bombs do is due to heat. Because so much energy is released in the detonation of a bomb, this thermal energy can actually do a lot of damage, especially on materials that do not have proper thermal insulation. A third type of damage is due to fragmentation. So when a bomb detonates, it can actually fling all sorts of projectiles, fragments that come from for example the casing of the shell or due to a combination of the shock and heat can cause projectiles to move away from the origin of a bomb at very high velocities. These accelerated fragments or masses act as projectiles that can puncture organisms or puncture walls and cause all sorts of damage. So these are three primary ways in which bombs do damage, mainly because it's a lot of energy that is released in a small volume in a short amount of time. My name is Walter Unglaub, and this is how do bombs do damage.

About the Author

Walter Unglaub graduated from the Colorado School of Mines with a B.S. in Engineering Physics and a M.S. Applied Physics.